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Does Workers’ Compensation Pay Your Full Salary?

Getting injured at work can be a very frightening and worrisome situation to endure. You will likely have several questions flooding your mind, such as:

  • How will I pay for my medical bills?
  • How will I continue earning an income while I cannot work?
  • How will I pay for my daily living expenses?

Luckily, you are probably covered under workers’ compensation insurance if you live in the United States. Workers’ compensation is designed to pay you while you are incapacitated as a result of an on-the-job injury.

Workers’ compensation insurance provides benefits while you are out of work due to your injury, but will it pay your full salary? Read on to find out.

The Benefits You Receive Depend on Several Factors

The amount of workers’ compensation benefits you receive depends on a number of factors, such as:

  • The extent of your disability
  • The amount of income you earn at your job
  • The estimated time it will take for you to heal

Here’s a breakdown of the workers’ compensation benefits in Arkansas:

Medical Benefits

Your employer is required to cover all reasonable expenses related to your medical care. However, they may designate your initial care provider, and your claim may be denied if you try to obtain non-emergency treatment without prior notice.

Temporary Total Disability Benefits

These benefits will pay two-thirds of your average weekly wage, subject to Arkansas’s maximum. In 2021, the maximum rate for total disability is $736. You’ll receive payments every other week for as long as you cannot work.

Temporary Partial Disability Benefits

These benefits will pay two-thirds of your average weekly wage deducted by what you earn on light duty, subject to the state’s maximum.

Permanent Partial Disability Benefits

The benefits you receive will vary according to your wages and the number of weeks, depending on how severe your injury is. The permanent partial disability rate for amputation or permanent total loss of use is the same as your total disability rate, subject to the state maximum. In 2021, the maximum is $552 per week.

Permanent Total Disability Benefits

These benefits will pay two-thirds of your average weekly wage, subject to the state’s weekly maximum.

We’re Here to Help

If you’ve been injured in a work-related accident, you may be eligible to receive workers’ compensation benefits. If you need help applying for benefits, or you believe your benefits were wrongfully denied, we may be able to help. Don’t delay—contact us right away with any questions you may have.

Contact the experienced attorneys at Caddell Reynolds Law Firm by calling (800) 889-6944 or filling out an online contact form today.

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